“Waiting for a Friend”

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“Waiting for a Friend” – Pastel pencil on sandpaper, 8.3×5″/21×13 cm

“Waiting for a Friend” – Pastel pencil on sandpaper, 8.3×5″/21×13 cm
From a photo by Roman Rocco Burgan (used by permission)

Ireland has a Slovakian artist in residence: Roman Rocco Burgan. He’s a highly skilled pastelist with an eye for intense color and dramatic clouds. I call him the “Master of the Skies.” Recently, he posted a picture of the sunset near his home, noting that this was why he paints like he does. “How could you NOT paint that??” he asked. He then suggested the rest of us give it a go. I took him up on it.

“Lingering Transition”

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“Lingering Transition” – Taipei, Taiwan -Pastel on sandpaper, 5.1×8.5″/12×22 cm

“Lingering Transition”
-Pastel on sandpaper, 5.1×8.5″/12×22 cm

The Four Beasts mark the boundary of the city. Over these, the sky moves every day. They may be hidden, revealed, baked or drenched; it all depends on the day. By evening, we had touched them all. We descended to the foothills in the gathering dusk. (Available for sale. Email or PM for details.)#

#pastel #softpastel #粉彩 #Taiwan #台灣 #Taipei #台北 #FourBeasts #四獸山

 

Cloud Studies

Cloud Studies

I was going to be on my own for an hour while waiting for an event. I didn’t know what I’d find in this recently opened park but I was prepared to paint plein air, even though the weather seemed iffy. The park itself is essentially a series of city-block-sized, flat-topped artificial “hills” on whose cambered sides is planted what they’re calling a “sea of flowers.” On top are a few bits of sports-themed topiary and some cartoon characters. The current blooms were muted, and the square hills looked more like bunkers to me. I walked the perimeter. I climbed up top again and looked around. Really? Was my imagination so dull that I could find nothing to paint?

Ten kilometers away, however, winds from the northeast were driving heavy clouds across the Tatun Group, a cluster of volcanic peaks that tops out at 1,120 meters (3,675 feet). Glad to be in the rain shadow, I sat on the grass and watched great curls of mist roll down from the summits. After awhile, I pulled out my DIY Inktense Plein Air kit for a couple of small studies. The Arches rough  watercolor paper doesn’t like to be scrubbed, so I worked it as little as possible. Quick though they were, these are among my more successful attempts at painting this kind of weather with the Derwent Inktense ink blocks.

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Thwackenheimer Luminescence Converter

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Just finished a small sketch this morning. Made me wonder what this thing does–besides float, of course.

Back in the late 2100s, Beryl Thwackenheimer devised a means by which to levitate a solid object by harnessing the energy shifts caused by variances in luminescence. Subtle changes in cloud formations, or even the appearance of a meteor in the night sky could actually cause the object to counteract gravity. The technique proved so effective that her first successful prototype got away from her before she had completed building it. These days, virtually every appliance and vehicle uses some version of the Thwackenheimer luminescence converter.

A flaw in Thwackenheimer’s system design causes the unit to repel any approaching object (like the ground, an ornithopter, or even a net). The extreme efficiency of this function has rendered impossible any attempts at recovery. It’s been a hundred and fifty years now, and fortunately, no one’s transporter has been damaged by the rogue prototype.

It’s still up there somewhere. No one can catch it and bring it down.